Social Equity


Our Core Is Community

Our Core Is Community

Emerald Thumb Industries core function is uplifting Our Communities.





At  ETI We Are Dedicated to Giving Back to Our Communities. ETI founding  team has philanthropically donated to and led the march with numerous  organizations that support those who need medical marijuana most.  We  aim to identify, operate and serve in communities where we can deliver  the most substantial economic impact.


ETI  also is a strong supporter with other advocate groups and organizations across  the country concerned about fixing a broken criminal justice system and  reinvesting  in poor and minority communities that have been battered by decades of  the government’s war on drugs.  

 

ETI  sees the importance of taking supportive actions, measures with collaborating with various long-standing organization focusing on the social justice and  civil rights issues of those wrongfully affected by the “War on Drugs”  policy within the poor and undeserved communities and will support  awareness and entrepreneurial efforts to help rebuild and revitalize  communities across the nation. Some of our collaborative partners are ACLU and NAACP.


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Failed War On Drugs

Failed War On Drugs


The War On Drugs


The war on drugs has been very inefficient in decreasing addiction while spending has risen steadily each year.


Steps are being taken to help rectify this, but it’s not enough. Brute force police crackdowns have been the United States government’s primary method of quelling the ongoing drug crisis, even though decades-old research has proven that drug abuse treatments are much more cost-effective and long-lasting.


In 1995, a study by RAND Corporation—a non-profit think tank dedicated to improving government policies through research and analysis—laid out the problem, specifically focusing on the cocaine epidemic. Though the number of cocaine users had gone down from 12 million in the 1980s to five million in 1992, the total amount of cocaine consumed remained the same as its mid-1980s peak. The number of heavy users – defined as individuals who used once a week or more – was growing. Essentially, this meant that while the participants may have changed, the drug trade and its consequences remained the same.


By looking at the annual cost of reducing cocaine consumption by 1% a year through various programs – including domestic enforcement, control in source countries, interdiction at borders, and treatment for drug abuse – some pretty decisive results were found. To wit, an increase of $34-million per year for treatment was easily the most cost-effective way to cut consumption by that average 1%. For comparison’s sake, the second most economically efficient method—local law enforcement—would cost an increase of more than five times that amount, and the most expensive—cutting supplies at the source—almost 20 times. And it keeps people off drugs more readily than punishment too, as 80% of individuals in treatment programs stay off drugs during treatment, and about 13% of heavy users either stop using entirely or greatly reduce their amount of cocaine usage.

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Drug-related Prison Populations

Drug-related Prison Populations

Drug-related prison populations continue to rise; yet putting addicts through rehab only costs 25% of keeping them in prison.

So why is the United States government still focusing so hard on enforcement tactics?


It comes down to the unwillingness of many to accept the reality of drug addiction as a public health issue. Conservative America isn’t exactly happy for heavy users to receive only rehabilitation as penance for their crimes. Many want punishment, fire and brimstone, and for the “sinners” to be struck down by the hand of God —or better yet, Clint Eastwood. Since they’re the taxpayers, there’s only so much the government can allocate to progressive methods before having to quell deafening cries of misuse.


It’s going to take a change in the public consciousness before any substantial changes are made; a realization that many drug users are just as much victims as the general public are. Excessive drug abuse is a health issue driven by difficult-to-combat mental impulses and systemic cultural problems. And although I agree that people who commit drug-related crimes should take responsibility for their actions, without forgiveness, education, and a belief in the propensity for others to improve, drug users will never be given the opportunity to do so.

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Do You Qualify for LA's Social Equity Program?

Do You Qualify for LA's Social Equity Program?


LA's Social Equity Program


The mission of LA’s Social Equity Program is to create new life outcomes for people who were negatively impacted by the failed War on Drugs. We applaud this mission, and lend our wholehearted support to the program.   

(If you believe you qualify, email us for assistance)  


The Social Equity Program is organized according to three tiers:  


Tier 1

To qualify as a Tier 1 Social Equity Applicant, you must be able to demonstrate that you have low income AND a prior California cannabis conviction, or low income AND at least 5 years cumulative residency in a disproportionately impacted area.  


Tier 1 Social Equity Applicants will receive 2:1 priority processing for retail licenses (storefront dispensary or delivery service), and for Microbusiness licenses that include retail. This means that the Department of Cannabis Regulation will issue two retail licenses to Tier 1 Social Equity Applicants for every one retail license it issues to a general applicant.   


Applicants in Tiers 1 through 3 will also receive priority processing for non-retail activity at a 1:1 ratio with non-Social Equity Applicants.  


The following definitions apply when determining eligibility for the Social Equity Program: 

•Low Income 

•California Cannabis Conviction 

•Disproportionately Impacted Area   


Low Income

Low Income is defined as income 80% or below the Area Median Income. According to the Survey, the Area Median Household income was $51,538. To qualify as a low income Tier 1 SEP Applicant, you must be able to prove that you earn $10,803 per year or less.   


California Cannabis Conviction 

California Cannabis Conviction refers to a cannabis-related crime that occurred prior to November 8, 2016, and could be classified as a citation or misdemeanor under current California law.   


Disproportionately Impacted Area  

Disproportionately Impacted Area refers to specific zip codes which have an unusually high rate of cannabis convictions. To qualify under Tier 1, an SEP applicant must have lived in any of the following zip codes for a total of at least 5 years, or at least 10 years to qualify for Tier 2.     


A Tier 1 Social Equity Applicant shall own no less than a 51 percent equity share of the business that would benefit from the issuance of the License. 

A Tier 1 Social Equity Applicant shall receive the following benefits: 

1. business, licensing and compliance assistance; 

2. expedited renewal processing; 

3. program site specific conditions; 

4. the potential for fee deferrals if the City Council adopts a fee deferral program; and 

5. access to an Industry Investment Fund if established.     


Tier 2 

A Tier 2 Social Equity Applicant shall meet the following criteria at time of applying for a License: 

1. Low Income and a minimum of five years cumulative residency in a Disproportionately Impacted Area; or 

2. a minimum of 10 years cumulative residency in a Disproportionately Impacted Area. 

A Tier 2 Social Equity Applicant shall own no less than a 33 1/3 percent equity share of the business that would benefit from issuance of the License. A Tier 2 Social Equity Applicant shall enter into a Social Equity Agreement with the City to provide business, licensing and compliance assistance to Tier 1 Social Equity Program participants. 


A Tier 2 Social Equity Applicant shall receive the following benefits: 

1. business, licensing and compliance assistance; 

2. expedited renewal processing; and 

3. program site specific conditions.     


Tier 3 

A Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant shall enter into a Social Equity Agreement with the City to provide capital, leased space, business, licensing and compliance assistance to Persons who meet the criteria to be a Tier 1 or Tier 2 Social Equity Applicant. A Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant shall provide Tier 1 Social Equity Applicants access to property with no rent and with prorated utilities for a minimum of two years. 


The minimum requirements of the property provided to the Tier 1 Social Equity Applicant shall be: 

1. Cultivation - minimum 500 square feet or 10 percent of Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant’s Business Premises, whichever is greater; 

2. Manufacturing - minimum 800 square feet or 10 percent of Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant’s Business Premises, whichever is greater; 

3. Testing - minimum 1,000 square feet or 10 percent of Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant’s Business Premises; 

4. Distributor - minimum 1,000 square feet or 10 percent of Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant’s Business Premises; 

5. Nonstorefront retail - minimum 1,000 square feet or 10 percent of Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant’s Business Premises; 

6. Storefront retail - minimum 1,000 square feet or 10 percent of Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant’s Business Premises, whichever is greater; 

7 Microbusiness - minimum 800 square feet or 10 percent of Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant's Business Premises, whichever is greater. 

A Tier 3 Social Equity Applicant shall receive the following benefits: 

1. expedited renewal processing; and 

2. program site specific conditions.    


Social Equity Applicants Tiers 1 and 2 shall make a good faith effort to have no less than 50 percent of the weekly hours of the Licensee’s workforce performed by Employees whose primary place of residence is within a three-mile radius of the Business Premises. Of those Employees, 20 percent shall be Social Equity Workers and 10 percent Transitional Workers. Social Equity Applicant Tier 3 shall make a good faith effort to have no less than 50 percent of the weekly hours of the Licensee’s workforce performed by Employees whose primary place of residence is within a five mile radius of the Business Premises. Of those Employees, 30 percent shall be Social Equity Workers and 10 percent 


Transitional Workers. 

Transitional Worker is defined in Section 104.12 (m). Social Equity Worker is a Person who is: 

1. Low Income and has a prior California Cannabis conviction as defined in Section 104.20(b); or 

2. Low Income and a minimum of five years cumulative residency in a Disproportionately Impacted Area. 


At a minimum, a Licensee is required to contact local community-based organizations, City of Los Angeles Work Source Centers, and other such similar organizations to facilitate job outreach, development, and placement services. A Licensee is required to provide a detailed semiannual report on the first business day of January and the first business day of July every year that provides evidence of its outreach efforts, including the number of persons interviewed, and details on who was hired to satisfy the good faith requirement.     


If you believe you qualify, or if you know someone who does, email us for assistance.


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